Lab report for chemistry - HaagsehonderdNl Lab report for chemistry - HaagsehonderdNl

Lab report for chemistry

Lab report for chemistry

The review date indicates when the article lab report for chemistry last reviewed from beginning to end to ensure that it reflects the most current science. 2014 that allows patients or their representatives direct access to laboratory test reports after having their identities verified, without the need to have the tests sent to a health practitioner first.

More ready access to test results, however, places you in a position of greater responsibility. You may encounter complex test results on lab reports and will need to recognize that there is a context in which providers use results to make treatment decisions. This may require that you educate yourself about your tests in order to understand their purpose and meaning. Patients who want to can still get their test results from their health practitioners and patients should still look to them as the ultimate informed partner for understanding test results and providing treatment options. Lab Tests Online encourages you to discuss your lab test results with your health practitioner, using this web site to help formulate your questions.

Once you receive or access your report from the laboratory, it may not be easy for you to read or understand, leaving you with more questions than answers. This article points out some of the different sections that may be found on a typical lab report and explains some of the information that may be found in those sections. Different laboratories generate reports that can vary greatly in appearance and in the order and kind of information included. Here is one example of what a lab report may look like. Note: Pathology reports, such as for a biopsy, will look different than this sample lab report. For some examples of what a pathology report may look like, see The Doctor’s Doctor: A Typical Pathology Report.

Lab Oversight: A Building Block of Trust. Patient name and identification number or a unique patient identifier and identification number. These are required for proper patient identification and to ensure that the test results included in the report are correctly linked to the patient on whom the tests were run. Name and address of the laboratory location where the test was performed. This is the date this copy of the report was printed. Often, the time that the report was printed will also be included. This report is an example of a cumulative report which is a report that includes results of several different tests run on different days.

This is the day the results were generated and reported to the ordering physician or to the responsible person. Tests may be run on a particular patient’s samples on different dates. Since a patient may have multiple results of the same test from different days, it is important that the report includes this information for correct interpretation of results. Sometimes a report will also include the name of other health practitioners requesting a copy of your report. For example, a specialist may order tests and request that a copy of the results be sent to your primary healthcare provider. Some tests can be performed on more than one type of sample.